Part 6 - How the king led the physician to the bedside of the sick girl, that he might see her condition

    101    When that meeting and bounteous (spiritual) repast was over, he took his hand and conducted him to the harem 102   He rehearsed the tale of the invalid and her illness, and...


Part 6 - How the king led the physician to the bedside of the sick girl, that he might see her condition

 

 

101

  

When that meeting and bounteous (spiritual) repast was over, he took his hand and conducted him to the harem

102

 

He rehearsed the tale of the invalid and her illness, and then seated him beside the sick (girl)

103

 

The physician observed the colour of her face, (felt) her pulse, and (inspected) her urine; he heard both the symptoms and the (secondary) causes of her malady

104

 

He said, “None of the remedies which they have applied builds up (health): they (the false physicians) have wrought destruction

105

 

They were ignorant of the inward state. I seek refuge with God from that which they invent.”

106

 

He saw the pain, and the secret became open to him, but he concealed it and did not tell the king

107

 

Her pain was not from yellow or black bile: the smell of every firewood appears from the smoke

108

 

From her sore grief he perceived that she was heart-sore; well in body, but stricken in heart

109

 

Being in love is made manifest by soreness of heart: there is no sickness like heartsickness

110

 

The lover's ailment is separate from all other ailments: love is the astrolabe of the mysteries of God

111

 

Whether love be from this (earthly) side or from that (heavenly) side, in the end it leads us yonder

112

 

Whatsoever I say in exposition and explanation of Love, when I come to Love (itself) I am ashamed of that (explanation)

113

 

Although the commentary of the tongue makes (all) clear, yet tongueless love is clearer

114

 

Whilst the pen was making haste in writing, it split upon itself as soon as it came to Love

115

 

In expounding it (Love), the intellect lay down (helplessly) like an ass in the mire: it was Love (alone) that uttered the explanation of love and loverhood

116

 

The proof of the sun is the sun (himself): if thou require the proof, do not avert thy face from him

117

 

If the shadow gives an indication of him, the sun (himself) gives spiritual light every moment

118

 

The shadow, like chat in the night-hours, brings sleep to thee; when the sun rises the moon is cloven asunder

119

 

There is nothing in the world so wondrous strange as the Sun, the everlasting spiritual Sun which hath no yesterday

120

 

Although the external sun is unique, still it is possible to imagine one resembling it

121

 

But the Sun by which the aether was brought into existence hath no peer

122

 

Where is room in the imagination for His essence, that the like of Him should come into the imagination?

123

 

When news arrived of the face of Shamsu’ddín (the Sun of the Religion), the sun of the fourth heaven drew in its head (hid itself for shame)

124

 

Since his name has come (to my lips), it behoves me to set forth some hint of his bounty

125

 

At this moment my Soul has plucked my skirt: he has caught the perfume of Joseph's vest

126

 

(He said): “For the sake of our years of companionship, recount one of those sweet ecstasies

127

 

That earth and heaven may laugh (with joy), that intellect and spirit and eye may increase a hundredfold

128

 

(I said): “Do not lay tasks on me, for I have passed away from myself (faná); my apprehensions are blunted and I know not how to praise

129

 

Everything that is said by one who has not returned to consciousness, if he constrains himself or boastfully exaggerates, is unseemly

130

 

How should I—not a vein of mine is sensible—describe that Friend who hath no peer

131

 

The description of this severance and this heart's blood do thou at present leave over till another time

132

 

He said: “Feed me, for I am hungry, and make haste, for Time is a cutting sword

133

 

The Súfí is the son of the (present) time, O comrade: it is not the rule of the Way to say ‘To-morrow

134

 

Art not thou indeed a Súfí, then? That which is (in hand) is reduced to naught by postponing the payment

135

 

I said to him: “It is better that the secret of the Friend should be disguised: do thou hearken (to it as implied) in the contents of the tale

136

 

It is better that the lovers' secret should be told in the talk of others

137

 

He said: “Tell this openly and nakedly: talk of religion is better overt than covert

138

 

Lift the veil and speak nakedly, for I do not wear a shirt when I sleep with the Adored One

139

 

I said: “If He should become naked in (thy) vision, neither wilt thou remain nor thy bosom nor thy waist

140

 

Ask thy wish, but ask with measure: a blade of straw will not support the mountain

141

 

If the Sun, by whom this world is illumined, should approach a little (nearer), all will be burned

142

 

Do not seek trouble and turmoil and bloodshed: say no more concerning the Sun of Tabriz

143

 

This (mystery) hath no end: tell of the beginning. Go, relate the conclusion of this tale

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